Tag Archives: application

REVIEW: Lightroom 4 Prepares For The Future

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 has been available a few months but only in the last week Adobe has included Lightroom in Adobe Creative Cloud subscriptions, which is potentially even bigger news than the new version 4. Photographers who have purchased Creative Cloud subscriptions now get Lightroom whenever and wherever they want it, and that makes Lightroom even more relevant than before. I’ve been working with Lightroom 4 since it was released and Adobe has made some smart improvements to the application that embrace new digital technology.

I believe the most vital improvements in Lightroom 4 happen in the new adjustment brush features. Lightroom became much more useful when the adjustment brush was added a couple years ago, but Lightroom 4 lets photographers make spot adjustments to counter moiré, reduce noise or adjust white balance. The white balance adjustment is very useful and I was surprised no one thought to spot-adjust white balance before. I was so surprised I actually launched Lightroom 3 to confirm it!

Lightroom 4 white balance adjustments

Basically, the Temp and Tint sliders in the Develop module can now be adjusted within a single adjustment brush point on the photo or as a general adjustment across the photo. My color correction techniques have always emphasized correction across entire images—color casts and white balance mistakes will almost always affect everything the camera sees. However, there are a few times when multiple light sources can skew results in a part of an image. There are also many photographers today who want to be more creative with their images than just getting the color correct. These photographers will really enjoy the new controls available in Lightroom 4.

I am also really excited that Lightroom 4 now supports video formats. Prosumer cameras have been shooting video for a few years now and it’s becoming mainstream—some photographers like Vincent Laforet are experimenting with the art form while wedding and event photographers are supplementing their income shooting video as well as their usual photos. Adobe worked to make Lightroom 4 provide a complete video workflow. I don’t think Lightroom 4 provides a complete workflow—it’s missing basic features like sound editing, though Creative Cloud users will have all the software they need for video editing. But Lightroom 4 does provide easy importing and exporting to Facebook and Flickr as well as to your hard drive. I think exporting to YouTube is essential though.

Lightroom 4 does provide Quick Develop module tools for video editing, which is where workflow comes in. Photographers can change exposure, white balance and all the tone controls used for images. You can also trim clips and capture a poster frame for presenting the video. This is the extent of video editing in Lightroom 4, and I think it’s a decent enough editing suite for photographers in the field but a photographer who wants to sell his video footage should invest in Creative Cloud, CS6 Production Premium or Adobe Premiere Elements. Amateur videographers should really consider Premiere Elements, though serious photographers might want to invest in CS6 Production Premium (or, better yet, hire someone who already has mastered Adobe’s video applications.)

Lightroom 4 map module

One of the most visually spectacular new features in Lightroom 4 is the Map module, powered by Google Maps, that lets photographers place their photos in specific locations. It’s a thrill to navigate the world in Lightroom 4 and see exactly where your photographic journeys have taken you, but I have a feeling Adobe will have to constantly play catch-up with advances in GPS and mapping technology. 3D mapping is starting to emerge and I think tagging photos by building floor as well as GPS location would be useful. I also thought the process of matching photos up with their locations was tedious (except when the photo already had location metadata). If there’s no location data, you can drag-and-drop photos onto the map to set their location. This is probably as good of a manual system as you can get, but it’s still a slog.

Lightroom 4 boasts improved shadow and highlight recovery, and you’ll have to learn some new sliders in the Develop module to master this. In Lightroom 3, the Basic sliders in the Develop module included exposure, recovery, fill light and blacks along with brightness and contrast. (Brightness and contrast have been together in Adobe’s settings lineup since the early days of Photoshop.) In Lightroom 4, exposure and contrast are together and the other four sliders are highlights, shadows, whites and blacks. It’s confusing to consider whites and highlights two separate things (same with shadows and blacks) and there aren’t many differences between the two that I can see. Generally, the Highlights and Shadows sliders will affect darks or lights without ruining the other and will avoid excessive contrast. I still prefer working with the Tone Curve settings to pinpoint the tone regions I want to work on, though I like how fast and easy I can produce results with the Highlights and Shadows sliders. If you don’t have time to work with the curves, try the new sliders.

Lightroom 4 soft proofing

For photographers who make prints of their work, the new soft proofing in Lightroom 4 might be useful. A “soft proof” is an on-screen representation of the final printed product, and it’s often hard to get a precise soft proof since a screen and a sheet of paper are two totally different substrates. I’ve relied on hard proofs on paper since the beginning of my career. Lightroom 4’s soft proofs look like they might be helpful but I still don’t trust them completely—there are too many factors in printing that can skew the results. But what I do find really useful in Lightroom 4 are the new gamut warnings which will show regions that are too bright or too dark to display any detail. Lightroom 4 will provide not only printer gamut warnings but monitor gamut warnings too, which I’ve not seen before.

Lightroom 4 book module

Lightroom has always had a fairly robust set of output modules (Slideshow, Print and Web) but in version 4 there is a new Book module for creating photo books. I have seen photo books offered by several photo production websites but I usually like to design my own in InDesign. I wondered if Lightroom’s Book module would be easy to use as well as robust, and I was pleasantly surprised to learn there’s a balance between software-generated layouts (see the Auto Layout panel in the sidebar) and fine controls. The Cell panel lets you put white space around images on all sides or each side separately. I found the caption and type tools very intuitive—text was overlaid on images right where I wanted them to be and I didn’t need to handle text frame corners. Everything is done inside the Book module sidebar. I found one user interface element to be particularly annoying: the inability to add photo cells on my own. The pages’ photo layouts are determined by the Auto Layout presets; you can make your own presets but they still adhere to predetermined layouts. You cannot simply drag and drop new images onto the page either, unless a photo cell already exists. The only real way to tweak photo placement is to add padding to photo cells, but this isn’t a great way to do it.

Lightroom has had integrated social sharing for awhile now, but it’s been improved in Lightroom 4 in a way I didn’t really expect. If you share to comment-capable albums (a Facebook album, for example), photos’ comments will be shown in Lightroom 4’s sidebar and you can write your own there as well. Your comments will then appear on the Facebook album entry. I thought this was a really neat way to leverage Facebook’s API and integrate social comments directly into Lightroom. I also love how you can include your Facebook albums in the Publish Services panel and push photos up to it just by dragging them onto the album name.

Lightroom 4 is another quality upgrade for a quality product, and its inclusion into Adobe Creative Cloud makes it available to even more people. On the other hand, I feel Lightroom is a mature application now and some of the features are not so exciting or unique. Other mature applications, including Photoshop and Illustrator, deal with the same problem sometimes. But the improvements in spot adjustments, shadows and highlights, and photo book layout in particular make me say Lightroom 4 is an upgrade worth buying.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4
Adobe Systems
US $149 full/$79 upgrade
Included with Adobe Creative Cloud
Rating: 8/10
Buy at Amazon.com

BOOK REVIEW: Two iOS App Books

This review covers two books on iPhone and iOS development: Visual Quickstart Guide: Objective-C by Steven Holzner and iPhone App Development: The Missing Manual by Craig Hockenberry. Ironically, the iPhone App Development book was published just after the release of the iPad and nowadays we call this iOS development after the operating system these devices use. This also includes the iPod Touch.

Visual Quickstart Guide: Objective-C, like most Visual Quickstart books, offers a solid introduction to the topic and many exercises to get readers familiar with the programming language. Objective-C is the native language for writing iOS applications and for awhile Apple would not accept apps written with other languages and cross-compiled to Objective-C. This has since changed but many developers believe coding with the native language makes for a better application.

The Visual Quickstart Guide teaches the basic elements of Objective-C but it doesn’t address every aspect of the language. Readers who are new to object-oriented programming will benefit more from this book, which teaches the concept and its implications in iOS development. Experienced developers who know OOP or similar languages like ActionScript 3 can learn a few things from the book but I think there are better resources out there.

The Missing Manual sets itself apart by offering beginning-to-end training for iOS development—everything from installing Xcode to selling apps from the Apple App Store. I really like this aspect of the book, and developers who want to make money with their products will find this very useful. I think there’s less emphasis on Objective-C but part of that is because Craig uses Apple’s developer tools like the Interface Builder to create the applications demonstrated in the book. The obvious downside to this is the fact that Apple’s developer tools are available only on Mac OS X computers—Windows users are out of luck, even though iOS devices are marketed to them too.

Both books are good buys, and as with most things each one offers something a little different. Objective-C is a solid introduction to the language and green developer would find it very useful. The Missing Manual is a more complete resource for iOS development and is written for the entrepreneurial developer who wants to sell apps as much as develop them.

Visual Quickstart Guide: Objective-C
Steven Holzner
Published by Peachpit Press
US $29.99
Rating: 8/10

iPhone App Development: The Missing Manual
Craig Hockenberry
Published by O’Reilly
US $39.99
Rating: 9/10

Pantone Turns iPhone into Color Studio on the Go

PRESS RELEASE

CARLSTADT, N.J., Sept. 21, 2009 – Over the last several years there has been a fundamental shift in the way designers work – projects have become more digital, and inspiration more spontaneous. Pantone LLC, an X-Rite company (NASDAQ: XRIT) and the global authority on color and provider of professional color standards for the design industries, today announced myPANTONE™, an iPhone™ application for the changing needs of today’s designer. myPANTONE gives graphic, digital, multimedia, fashion, interior and industrial designers the freedom to capture, create and share PANTONE® Color Palettes – wherever they go and whenever they find inspiration.

pantoneiphone

“myPANTONE marries the power of the iPhone with the inspiration of PANTONE Color Palettes, enabling designers to be creative whenever inspiration strikes them. Providing a digital, portable design studio and essential color tools at their fingertips, myPANTONE gives designers the freedom to access PANTONE Colors anywhere, without the need to be in their office or carry around cumbersome guides,” said Andy Hatkoff, vice president of technology licensing for Pantone. “Now with myPANTONE’s Portable Color Memory™ in their pocket, designers no longer need to agonize trying to recall an exact color.”

With myPANTONE, designers have access to all the PANTONE Color Libraries, including the PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM® for coated, uncoated and matte stock; the PANTONE Goe System™ for coated and uncoated stock; PANTONE PASTELS for coated and uncoated stock; and the PANTONE FASHION + HOME SMART Color System. The application also enables designers to easily create harmonious color palettes by finding complementary, analogous and triadic combinations for selected colors.

myPANTONE takes advantage of the iPhone’s built-in camera to let designers capture whatever inspires them – from architecture and street scenes to fashion and nature. Colors can be extracted from any photo on the iPhone and then matched to the closest PANTONE Colors.

Once created, users can share color palettes with other iPhone users and automatically post notification of new palettes to Facebook and Twitter, attaching text notes and voice annotations to palettes when posting. Color palettes can be emailed to colleagues and clients as color patches, or as application-ready swatch files for use in design applications including Adobe® Creative Suite® (.ase), CorelDraw® and QuarkXPress®. Designers can also share their color palettes with other designers by sending them to the Pantone-hosted Web site, www.mypantone.com.

Each color swatch in myPANTONE includes sRGB, HTML and L*a*b* values. Additionally, myPANTONE provides invaluable cross-referencing color capabilities to make it simple for users to find similar colors among the various PANTONE Color Libraries. For example, users can identify the PANTONE Goe Color that most closely matches a given PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM Color.

Pricing, Availability and System Information

myPANTONE is available for download at the Apple iPhone App Store for U.S. $9.99/€7.99/£6.99. myPANTONE is compatible with iPhone OS 3.0 or higher, and can be used on the iPhone or iPod® Touch.

About Pantone

Pantone LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite, Incorporated, has been the world’s color authority for 45 years, providing design professionals with products and services for the colorful exploration and expression of creativity. Always a source for color inspiration, Pantone also offers designer-inspired products and services for consumers. More information is available at www.pantone.com.

About X-Rite

X-Rite, Incorporated, is the global leader in color science and technology. The company, which now includes color industry leader Pantone, develops, manufactures, markets and supports innovative color solutions through measurement systems, software, color standards and services. X-Rite’s expertise in inspiring, selecting, measuring, formulating, communicating and matching color helps users get color right the first time and every time, which translates to better quality and reduced costs. X-Rite serves a range of industries, including printing, packaging, photography, graphic design, video, automotive, paints, plastics, textiles, dental and medical. For further information, please visit www.xrite.com.

Serif Releases PagePlus X4

right-boxshot2

Serif announced today that PagePlus X4, the newest version of their page layout application, is now available. I have decided not to conduct a full review of PagePlus X4 due to my design and writing workload, but I wanted to spread the announcement:

PRESS RELEASE

NOTTINGHAM, UK & NASHUA, NH – August 3, 2009Serif, a leading independent design, publishing and creative software developer, today released a significant upgrade to its award-winning desktop publishing software PagePlus X4, which offers the perfect blend of powerful creative design, professional results and affordability, making high-end desktop publishing capabilities more attainable for small businesses, professionals and home-users than ever before.

PagePlus X4 continues to offer its hallmark feature-set including thousands of professional templates and the specialized Cutout and Logo studios, which make professional-quality results quick and easy. Advanced features such as the new learning zone, integrated photo editing capabilities, new sophisticated graphics tools, industry standard file compatibility and added easy-to-use tools to enhance productivity; extend PagePlus’ lead over similarly priced rivals.

“PagePlus X4 is a very exciting release for us, as it makes professional desktop publishing software even more accessible for all levels of user,” said Gary Bates, Serif’s Managing Director. “As always we have listened to the requests of our knowledgeable customers and, with advanced productivity, even more industry-standard file compatibility and powerful graphics features, have delivered a significant upgrade that will be appreciated by new and existing users alike.”

Key new features and benefits include:

  • Innovative Learning Zone – Quick and easy access to printable or video tutorials, Serif support and the vibrant user community.
  • Integrated Photo Editing – PhotoLab puts more than 70 professional photo adjustments and artistic effects at the user’s fingertips, along with quick fix options like one-touch red-eye removal, blemish removal or masking capabilities
  • Additional Industry-standard File Compatibility – Import MS Word documents and OpenOffice.org ODF files. Import text and pictures from Microsoft Word 2007 documents
  • Anchored Objects – Maintain a picture or drawing’s position relative to specific text, a column, frame, margin or page whilst remaining fully editable
  • High Impact Graphics Tools – Joining and cutting shapes to create eye catching illustrations such as logos can now be achieved directly within PagePlus
  • Photo-quality Frames and Borders – Drag ‘n’ drop photo realistic frames and borders into documents and resize without losing quality

Additional productivity enhancements include improvements to PDF® import enabling even more advanced PDF editing, an enhanced resource manager which makes it easier than ever to stay in control of long documents, dynamic guides for quick-snap alignment of objects on a page, tabbed workspace for quickly switching between publications and a redesigned Startup Wizard which makes viewing templates and selecting design themes simple.

About Serif

Serif is the publisher of the award-winning software range that includes PagePlus™, PhotoPlus™, DrawPlus™, WebPlus™, AlbumPlus™, MoviePlus™, PanoramaPlus™ and Digital Scrapbook Artist™ and more. Founded in 1987 with the aim to develop low-cost alternatives to high-end publishing and graphics packages, Serif has been repeatedly praised for its powerful yet easy-to-use software which has put professional effects and demanding publishing tasks within the reach of ordinary PC users around the world. Now with over 6 million customers worldwide, Serif has over 200 employees at its head office, development and European sales centre in Nottingham, UK and its North American sales operation in New Hampshire, US.

Adobe Web Apps, Part 2: BrowserLab

Adobe has become more and more aggressive in the field of web applications, producing various services like Photoshop Express and Acrobat.com to complement their shrink-wrapped software. According to Devin Fernandez, Senior Product Manager for Dreamweaver, the company’s “hosted services” strategy takes advantage of the convenience and quick development times inherent in online applications. Shorter production times means that these applications can be developed and improved faster and more often.

Betas for two new online applications were announced recently by Adobe. One is InContext Editing, a streamlined online content editing system that’s handy for Dreamweaver users. The first part of this series comprises an analysis and review of InContext Editing. The other application is BrowserLab, a service that allows website testing for multiple browsers. This practice is essential for any web designer and any tool that makes the process easier deserves a look.

Pain points

Adobe looks for “pain points” when developing products: I’ve heard this phrase more than a few times during various demos and discussions over the years. BrowserLab is Adobe’s response to several of customers’ pain points: speed, convenience, simplicity and productivity. BrowserLab is designed to improve these four points for users. The browser emulator concept is not new—BrowserCam and browsershots.org are two services similar to BrowserLab—but Adobe hopes to improve on the concept.

BrowserLab is currently in limited distribution. Adobe planned to accept only 3,500 users for the initial preview but demand was high enough that this was increased to 8,300. The service is being tweaked and improved in preparation for a full launch, at which point it will become a paid service. For now the development team is focused on improving stability and performance.

The BrowserLab experience

BrowserLab has the same professional black/gray design as most of Adobe’s other web applications. The application is easy to use, though BrowserLab has relatively few functions and doesn’t need much user interface to be effective. There are only three view modes: 1-up, 2-up and onion skin view. Onion skinning overlays one browser image on another, which is a good way to see small differences between browsers. Users can also zoom anywhere from 75% to 200% to get a close view of the results.

Onion skinning overlays one browser result with another—in this example, Designorati.com is being tested with Firefox 3 and Internet Explorer 7.
Onion skinning overlays one browser result with another—in this example, Designorati.com is being tested with Firefox 3 and Internet Explorer 7.

I like using BrowserLab, but for a product like this the big question is whether or not it can faithfully test all the browsers you need tested. At this time BrowserLab can emulate four modern browsers and one browser that I consider non-modern:

  • Internet Explorer 6 for Windows
  • Internet Explorer 7 for Windows
  • Firefox 2 for Windows and Mac
  • Firefox 3 for Windows and Mac
  • Safari 3 for Mac
BrowserLab already has most of the browsers I test for, and several others are in the works.
BrowserLab already has most of the browsers I test for, and several others are in the works.

Internet Explorer 8, Safari 4, Opera and Chrome and next up for addition to BrowserLab. I think BrowserLab needs to emulate all these browsers in order to be successful: the ability to test all needed browsers in one application is what will make BrowserLab popular. Fortunately, the BrowserLab team tells me they are working on this right now. For now BrowserLab has a limited browser set, and that’s one reason why I still use bonafide web browsers to test my websites. Dreamweaver’s Live View is also a nice tool for website testing, but it’s not always accurate.

Another reason why I test in actual browsers is because BrowserLab is not a browser emulator: it works by screen-capturing websites in various browsers and displaying the resulting images. These images are not interactive, so you can’t test JavaScript or CSS interactivity and you can’t see Flash or other animations. Flash can also give BrowserLab a false image: in one test, BrowserLab showed a Flash animation’s mask did not work in Firefox 3 for Windows. I checked it out in that browser and learned the browser applied the mask a split-second after rendering the rest of the page. BrowserLab captured the screen too soon to reveal this. Scott Fegette, Technical Product Manager for Dreamweaver tells me the BrowserLab team is looking to actual emulation of browsers in a web application, but for now they are going to stay with screen captures.

Top: A website I designed, tested in BrowserLab. Bottom: The same website viewed with the same browser being tested in BrowserLab. The Flash graphic and headlines (styled with sIFR 3) are not visible in BrowserLab but do work online.
Top: A website I designed, tested in BrowserLab. Bottom: The same website viewed with the same browser being tested in BrowserLab. The Flash graphic and headlines (styled with sIFR 3) are not visible in BrowserLab but do work online.

Top: A website I designed, tested in BrowserLab. Bottom: The same website viewed with the same browser being tested in BrowserLab. The Flash graphic and headlines (styled with sIFR 3) are not visible in BrowserLab but do work online.

Still, BrowserLab is a handy tool if my computer’s unavailable, and it’s online so I can use it anywhere. I want to see more available browsers (such as Internet Explorer 8) and it would be nice to be able to mark a particular capture as a model and have BrowserLab show where other browsers fail to duplicate it, but I think BrowserLab is on its way to becoming a good tool for web designers.

One more thing for Dreamweaver users

Dreamweaver users can leverage BrowserLab even further with an extension that allows screen capturing and testing directly from Dreamweaver CS4. The BrowserLab extension requires Extension Manager 2.1 and comes in two parts, but completing the installation process will add a BrowserLab panel to Dreamweaver CS4. From there users can send a local or server copy of the active page to BrowserLab for viewing. The combination of Dreamweaver’s Live View and BrowserLab allows users to preview dynamic interfaces, including JavaScript and Ajax, and also preview websites from behind a firewall. Other service-based solutions can’t do this.

Adobe Web Apps, Part 1: InContext Editing

Adobe has become more and more aggressive in the field of web applications, producing various services like Photoshop Express and Acrobat.com to complement their shrink-wrapped software. According to Devin Fernandez, Senior Product Manager for Dreamweaver, the company’s “hosted services” strategy takes advantage of the convenience and quick development times inherent in online applications. Shorter production times means that these applications can be developed and improved faster and more often.

Betas for two new online applications were announced recently. One is BrowserLab, a service that allows website testing for multiple browsers. This practice is essential for any web designer and in the second part of this series I analyze and review BrowserLab. The other is InContext Editing, which I first saw last year at Adobe headquarters in San Jose and has since been upgraded to version 1.5 in late April.

InContext Editing

InContext Editing is a streamlined online content editing system deployable by Dreamweaver CS4 or the InContext Editing website, incontextediting.adobe.com. While many content management systems are proprietary and others like Drupal are open source and web-based, InContext Editing is a standalone web application so it doesn’t require extra code or installed software to work—all it requires is a modern browser. The user interface has the same gray design style found in BrowserLab and other Adobe web applications, and it looks good and works well.

Editing with InContext Editing is simple and effective.
Editing with InContext Editing is simple and effective.

InContext Editing has more functionality than BrowserLab but that also creates some weak user interface elements: for example, in order to reconfigure a website’s settings you have to click its Manage Users button, which then takes you a screen where the Configure Site button resides. It makes more sense to have both buttons available from the main window. Another example is the Remove Site button, which I had to use when one of my client’s websites launched and the testing site was no longer valid. It’s possible to remove a site from InContext Editing, but it’s not clear that all users must be deleted and all invitations rescinded before the Remove Site button reveals itself.

Managing users with InContext Editing is easy, but it can be hard sometimes to find what you need to administer users or site settings.
Managing users with InContext Editing is easy, but it can be hard sometimes to find what you need to administer users or site settings.

The other difficulty I had with InContext Editing is some difficulty handling content modified with JavaScript or Ajax. I learned this after using InContext Editing with a website modified with sIFR 3, which replaces text with Flash text so designers can use fonts beyond standard web fonts. InContext Editing was set up to edit a content block with only headings and paragraphs, but it said it could not function because prohibited tags were in the content block. I learned after some troubleshooting that sIFR, which was modifying the headings, caused the fatal error even though the HTML code was not modified. InContext Editing works well for simple webpages running standard HTML code, but scripts and dynamic content can make it incompatible. Adobe hopes to improve InContext Editing’s handling of these components in the future.

Despite these usability issues, and what seems to be a lot of time loading pages and building editing screens, InContext Editing is a handy tool for web designers whose clients have small pages and want to revise some content. I like that it’s simple, quick, and doesn’t require any software installation. It’s supposed to be so easy that anyone can use it, but there’s a learning curve and I had to consult with the help files a few times.

InContext Editing + Contribute?

One thing that excited me about InContext Editing was the possibility of using it in tandem with Contribute. One of my clients in particular already uses Contribute in-house for content management and the combination of Contribute and InContext Editing would have allowed them to edit content inside and outside the office. However, it seems that Contribute CS4 will not allow editing if InContext Editing code is detected on a page. Adobe’s position is that InContext Editing is designed to make simple updates to basic webpages, while Contribute is designed for more sophisticated webpages and workgroups.

Two benefits for Dreamweaver users

Adobe has made both BrowserLab and InContext Editing especially tempting for Dreamweaver CS4 users. InContext Editing is easily deployed by Dreamweaver CS4, with editable and repeating regions available with a click in the InContext Editing panel. You can also manage the CSS classes available to clients with this panel. The code for InContext Editing regions is quite clean, with a single div tag around the editable content:

< div ice:editable="*" > Content here < /div > (spaces added for clarity)

Editable regions can be inserted with Dreamweaver CS4, very much like template editable regions.
Editable regions can be inserted with Dreamweaver CS4, very much like template editable regions.

The asterisk property for the “editable” attribute allows all available HTML formatting in InContext Editing, including strong/em, indenting, creating lists, inserting images and more. The web designer, working with Dreamweaver CS4, can restrict these however he or she chooses. Regions can also be created directly with InContext Editing from the web browser. The other treat for Dreamweaver CS4 users is the ability to set up a keyboard shortcut for invoking InContext Editing within a web browser—however, it involves editing a JavaScript file and looks like anyone with an HTML editor (or a text editor) can hack it. Here’s how it’s done:

  1. Open the ice.conf.js file. If you use Dreamweaver to set up a website for InContext Editing, this will be found in includes/ice/ by default.
  2. Rewrite the PC keyboard shortcut (found in line 43) and the Mac keyboard shortcut (found in line 60).

The future of InContext Editing

I’m curious to see how InContext Editing fares in the future, given the many choices available to web designers for editing and managing content. Adobe is currently meeting with InContext Editing customers for feedback for a version 2 to be released in the future, but we’ll see how that turns out. It’s hard to say how much InContext Editing will change from version 1 to version 2, but I think InContext Editing’s simplicity and its browser-based ease of use gives it a lot of potential. More robust editing and management tools will help InContext Editing secure a place in the web designer’s toolkit.