Tag Archives: book

The Twitter Book Is The Definitive Resource (So Far)


Twitter can be an arcane technology, requiring tricks for functions like sending direct messages or executing a successful search at Twitter.com. This combined with the fact that Twitter is the hottest social media sensation today is problematic—everyone knows Twitter is the hot communications tool of the moment, but not many know how to use it effectively and a lot of people don’t actually know what it really is. If Twitter is to achieve mainstream success (which it has not), then it has to be as easy to use as e-mail.

For now the next best thing is The Twitter Book by Tim O’Reilly (founder of the publishing company O’Reilly) and Sarah Milstein, who was the 21st person to use Twitter—back when it was called Twttr. They are the perfect duo to write this book: they have a strong Twitter pedigree and a down-to-earth writing style that is just right for a book like this. The result is a book that’s not a textbook or even the usual O’Reilly technical book—it’s a book that feels more like a conversation, which is ironic since the authors maintain that Twitter is a conversational tool as much as it is a micro-blogging tool. This all means that The Twitter Book is a good fit for the uninitiated as much as it is for the fanatics.

Complete coverage, yet never complete

Twitter is relatively new and so it is constantly changing, with more apps and marketing theories surrounding it every day. Unfortunately, books do not change once the ink hits the paper and so The Twitter Book is already beginning a slow crawl into obsolescence. This can’t be helped—it’s the nature of the printed page (as opposed to the HTML page)—and so I am otherwise impressed by the completeness of the book. It’s well-organized with sections on:

  • Getting started with Twitter and following others,
  • Building a Twitter account people will want to follow,
  • Publishing pictures, links and entire stories on Twitter,
  • Perfecting your Twitter profile, and
  • Using Twitter for business: goals, managing staff and tweets, building PR and even making money.

I can’t think of a Twitter topic this book doesn’t cover. A few topics could have been covered with greater depth—the swarm of Twitter apps, for example—but they are better served by online resources that can keep growing as they do. Some books, including many printed by O’Reilly, offer extra material online that would have been wonderful for The Twitter Book, but for some reason the book offers nothing like this. It does cite many third-party websites though.

The Twitter Book‘s design and layout is not too flashy and serves its purpose very well. I’m normally bothered by books that puts all its pictures on the left pages and all its text on the right pages but in this book it seems to work well. Maybe it’s because the pictures aren’t just photographs but screenshots and charts that carry content. One improvement I would recommend to the authors is to better handle the web addresses (URLs) in the book: it’s fine to have them on the pages where they are referred to but an appendix listing them all by topic would be ideal. And it’s very ironic that, even though URL shortening is an essential Twitter skill, no URLs were shortened in this book even when it was desperately needed. Here’s one from page 163:


The only way to check out these links is to type them in, and it’s quite a chore. Using a URL shortener like bit.ly would have been a great help to readers and also allowed O’Reilly to track clickthroughs.

A definitive resource

Despite a couple little things that I thought could be improved, The Twitter Book is the definitive resource for Twitter users and particularly useful for new users. I can’t think of a book that covers Twitter with the same depth and style. Unfortunately there is a lot more to be read about Twitter, and for that one will have to start browsing the Web. But for those who want to start with words on paper, The Twitter Book is the one to buy.

The Twitter Book
Tim O’Reilly and Sarah Milstein
Published by O’Reilly
Rating: 10/10

BOOK REVIEW: “Do Good Design” Not A Typical Design Book


At a publishing company I used to work for, I was asked to produce an invitation for an award ceremony honoring community activists. I’ve always been bothered to the point of activism by the sheer volume of waste paper and media our society produces daily, so I had the idea to design an invitation that was stamped upon waste cardboard rather than printed on pristine paper. Unfortunately, someone at the company didn’t like that idea and the project was given to another, less maverick designer.

Maybe I was onto something after all.

Do Good Design: How Designers Can Change The World is a unique book. It’s the only graphic design book I can think of that considers the ethical ramifications of design and treats it as a tool for good or evil—and argues that our world is suffering from serious maladies brought about by the subversion of design for evil purposes. Almost no designers think about such things—they’re too busy learning the new features of Photoshop CS4 or updating their LinkedIn profiles to get more clients and more money. Perhaps that’s why I think this book is an essential read for everyone in the industry.

The big problems: overconsumption and the end of the world

Author David B. Berman, who has become known as an advocate of “good design” in his native Ontario, believes graphic design does far more than anyone realizes to shape our perceptions of the world and control our behaviors, and in the past century designers have unwittingly contributed to a world of overconsumption and environmental destruction that will eventually lead to an unsustainable way of life. Exhibit Number One in Berman’s argument of the power of design is the Palm Beach County ballot used in the 2000 U.S. election: this ballot was so poorly designed that many people mistakenly voted for Pat Buchanan instead of Al Gore—swinging that county’s vote to George W. Bush and setting the United States up for eight years of war, death and outrage.

Buy the book if only for the international perspective

Berman traveled to a wide variety of countries around the world while writing Do Good Design, and I encourage American designers to buy this book if only to learn more about what American graphic design, branding and lifestyle are doing to the world. Did you know…?:

  • Thousands of Third World schools, orphanages and public signage sport the Coca-Cola logo. It costs Coca-Cola only $200 to brand an entire village.
  • Americans know Hugo Boss as the high-end clothing company. Most Americans don’t know that Hugo Boss himself designed the Nazi SS and Hitler Youth uniforms during World War II.
  • Taipei 101, one of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, is so large and heavy—700,000 tons—that it’s believed to have increased the instance of earthquakes across Taipei.

Berman’s thesis is that the drive for overbranding and overconsumption is due to graphic design, in particular American design and product development. Do Good Design looks at the thesis in a fascinating way, with around-the-globe observations and plenty of preaching. If you want to remain in your bubble of preconceptions about design and the world, don’t read this book.

A call for activism

For Berman, it’s not enough for readers to simply read Do Good Design and go back to the usual work for the usual clients. The last section of the book is a toolkit of sustainable design practices, manifestos from various organizations and a general push to become a “good design” activist. This is going to make some readers uncomfortable, but that’s what makes this book unique. There are a variety of small actions mentioned that will move things in the right direction. Others actions—such as pressing for sustainable design in the workplace—are more complicated. Berman thinks bosses and company owners will work with designers, but I think they’re just as likely to fire you if you start advocating changes they don’t want.

Do Good Design is a hard book to rate because it’s not necessarily perfect: it can be preachy and readers who don’t like being pressed to change may not like the last 30 pages. However, Berman’s message is too important to ignore and I encourage every designer to read this book and maybe change the world. My rating reflects the importance of Berman’s message.

Do Good Design: How Designers Can Change The World
David B. Berman
Published by New Riders and AIGA
Rating: 10/10

BOOK REVIEW: Photoshop CS4: The Missing Manual


Who misses the printed manuals that use to come with Adobe’s applications? I used to read those things, but now they’re only online. The last Adobe Creative Suite product that shipped with manuals was CS3 Production Premium, which came in a large, satisfying box full of manuals. Well, it seems David Pogue missed the manuals and began the “Missing Manuals” line of books designed to fill in for those manuals.

Lesa Snider King has written Photoshop CS4: The Missing Manual and it’s worthy of the title. The book is over 750 pages and has a massive amount of information about almost all of Photoshop CS4’s functions. Lesa does a good job of writing clearly yet with a little humor, which is easy to overdo. The interesting thing about Photoshop CS4: The Missing Manual is that it’s not just a dry technical manual but also combined with some simple tutorials that illustrate some of Photoshop CS4’s best and most important features. These tutorials are relatively simple and aren’t as satisfying as the advanced things you’ll find in books like Adobe’s Classroom in a Book series, but for beginner and intermediate users they work just fine—and that’s the audience this books serves most.

When is a manual not a manual?

When I first started reading this book for review, I had to decide whether to judge this book as a “tips and tricks” book or a true manual, which has a different purpose and structure. I decided to judge it as a manual, and in that regard Photoshop CS4: The Missing Manual has some gaps. I think every good manual must make it easy to find out how to operate something when it’s needed; however, this book doesn’t group things together to make them easy to find. I went to the index to learn more about the Adjustments panel, one of Photoshop CS4’s most important new features. I learned the panel itself is given little notice because its functions are explained throughout the book in various sections. A user needing to decipher the Adjustments panel’s icons would be hard-pressed to do so with this book.

Not everything about Photoshop CS4 is covered in the book. Some things like Color Settings are mysteriously not covered at all, which I think is a shame. Others are covered but maybe not as thoroughly as the online Adobe help docs. But most Photoshop CS4 tools and commands are indeed covered, so I would bet Photoshop CS4: The Missing Manual stands as the most comprehensive “missing manual” in the bookstore today. It’s not perfect, and it’s not exactly a manual for good or for bad, but it’s still a fine resource.

Photoshop CS4: The Missing Manual
Lesa Snider King
Published by Pogue Press/O’Reilly
Rating: 8/10

BOOK REVIEW: The Hot Shoe Diaries Enlightens and Engages


Last year, “Legendary Magazine Photographer” Joe McNally published The Moment It Clicks, which was hyped as one of the greatest photography books ever published. I thought it was a great book, but not perfect—the handling of terminology bothered me, and I had hoped for more writing in a book over 250 pages. But that was in 2008, and this year Joe has published a new book, The Hot Shoe Diaries. Maybe it’s because I’ve had my head down the past few months working for my clients, but this book seems to have had less hype thrown at it—which is ironic, because I think The Hot Shoe Diaries surpasses its year-old predecessor.

More text, more stories, more enlightenment

The Moment It Clicks focuses on a relatively broad collection of photography stories and insights; The Hot Shoe Diaries focuses on lighting, and that focus really brings the book together. The first section of the book is an excellent survey of lighting equipment, settings and Joe’s own secret recipes for success in the field (look for his camera grip technique on page 40). The rest of the book presents a variety of Joe’s stories about lighting problems and solutions he’s encountered—everything from one-light jobs to assignments requiring lots of lights (up to 50!). You’ll also find a small appendix that covers some settings on the Nikon speedlights, but The Nikon Creative Lighting System by Mike Hagen is a far more comprehensive resource.

The Hot Shoe Diaries seems to have a lot more text than The Moment It Clicks, and the stories are just as compelling. I think the focus on lighting actually helped Joe bring together a more interesting collection of tales that really teach readers something great. And I think it’s interesting that there are no footnotes as there were in The Moment It Clicks—I didn’t even notice they were missing.

Something should be said about Joe’s writing style, which is a treat to read but might put off a few people. I prefer a clear, concise writing style with some humor, and sometimes I shake my head a little bit at Joe’s constant use of vernacular, pop culture references and otherwise goofy lines (“Say hello to my li’l frenn!”, “word editors who wouldn’t know a good photograph even if crawled up their zeppelin-sized pantaloons and bit them in their ample buttocks”). Writers normally avoid clichés, but in that second phrase Joe is recharging two clichés with words normally found in children’s books. Despite all this, I still think Joe’s books are fun to read without quite getting too annoying—and anyone who references The Uncanny X-Men at Photoshop World deserves a pass!

Good design, plenty of content and essential focus are what makes The Hot Shoe Diaries a must-have for photographers who use lighting beyond their camera’s pop-up flash. This book does more than give us some cool Joe McNally tales—it gives us a long glimpse into Joe’s working world, complete with camera settings, equipment recommendations and detailed lighting setups for some of his most compelling images. This is where great lighting really happens.

The Hot Shoe Diaries
Joe McNally
Published by New Riders
Rating: 10/10

BOOK REVIEW: YouTube: An Insider’s Guide to Climbing the Charts


Producing successful online social media is such a conundrum—producing quality content is one thing, but how do you create something that the online community will make viral? The stakes are higher now that marketing vice-presidents have noticed the power of online social media: companies are producing promotional videos for YouTube and Facebook profiles, hoping people will latch onto them and adopt the brand promise.

So how do you capture this kind of viral devotion? In the case of YouTube, it might make sense to buy YouTube: An Insider’s Guide to Climbing the Charts. It’s written by a YouTube heavyweight (Alan Lastufka, once one of the 100 Most Subscribed Comedians on YouTube) and an expert on do-it-yourself video production and promotion (Michael W. Dean). Lisa Donovan, a “YouTube star” who parlayed her video bits into a short run on MadTV, says this is “the only YouTube book worth getting.” So the pedigree is there for YouTube: An Insider’s Guide to be a true classic, with unique techniques you won’t find anywhere else.

Proven principles for success

The truth, which the book demonstrates very well, is that the path to success is really based on two simple principles: quality content and quality promotion. YouTube: An Insider’s Guide devotes a lot of pages to storytelling, video direction, shooting, editing and the fundamentals of producing a video people will want to watch. The information in this section is solid but I didn’t really learn anything I didn’t know already—readers who are already experienced producers will not be particularly thrilled by this section.

Fortunately, the majority of pages are dedicated to Alan Lastufka’s deconstruction of YouTube and techniques for YouTube-specific promotion. I learned that YouTube has its own culture and community of users, and by adopting the community one can end up being adopted themselves. Key techniques such as commenting, leveraging third-party social media, the YouTube Partner program and video responses are all covered; very few are covered in depth, but there isn’t a whole lot of depth to begin with. Alan says just enough to make readers dangerous with YouTube.

The author’s rants

YouTube: An Insider’s Guide falls short in some respects. I liked Alan’s writing style, which was authoritative yet fairly informal, but Michael Dean sometimes came across as somewhat…odd. Nowhere is this more noticeable than in Chapter 14, “Closing Arguments,” which has almost nothing to do with YouTube and everything to do with Dean’s ramblings about what’s wrong with the Internet, why C-SPAN is better than any news show, what’s wrong with the world, what’s wrong with “The Man,” and how to life life right among other topics. Now I’m all for personal manifestos, but not in a book like this. The other thing that bothered me a little was the book’s dependence on a handful of YouTube celebrities (Lisa Donovan, Kevin Nalty, Hank Green and a few others) to show the celebrity potential in YouTube. It seems the same seven “celebrities” are discussed over and over, and I had heard of none of them until I read YouTube: An Insider’s Guide. I’m not sure “celebrity” is an accurate word to describe these YouTube users, and it makes me wonder if true fame is achievable within the confines of YouTube.


I recommend YouTube: An Insider’s Guide for anyone looking to start up and promote a YouTube channel with quality content—a casual YouTube user could get some good information by reading this book as well, but it is really written for content creators. There aren’t many books out on the market about YouTube, and this has perhaps the most knowledgeable authors of the bunch so it’s a great buy.

YouTube: An Insider’s Guide to Climbing the Charts
Alan Lastufka and Michael W. Dean
Published by O’Reilly
Rating: 8/10

BOOK REVIEW: The Nikon Creative Lighting System


After reviewing The Hot Shoe Diaries, I have lighting on my mind and another lighting book to review: Mike Hagen’s The Nikon Creative Lighting System. Unlike Diaries, this book is a nuts-and-bolts compendium on Nikon’s lighting gear combined with chapters on how to get the most out of the gear and case studies for real-world instruction. It’s very well done and I think photographers working with Nikon speedlights should consider picking it up.

Definitive directions

What I like (and don’t like) about this book is the extensive coverage of Nikon’s speedlights, including the SB-600, the discontinued SB-800 and its replacement, the SB-900. Also covered in detail are the Speedlight Commander Kit (R1C1) and Speedlight Remote Kit (R1). The bulk of the book is devoted to the operation of these five products, which is good for those who sometimes need instructions for all these products in the field. However, it’s not such a good thing if you only own one speedlight—the rest of the pages are fairly useless in this case. I’ve owned a SB-800 for a few years and just picked up a SB-900, and I’m using this book to help master my new gadget.

The rest of the book—which doesn’t constitute many pages—covers general flash knowledge such as flash theory, how to successfully use wireless flash, white balance, using gels and case studies that really help apply the theory to practice. These case studies are really helpful because they are written so each one applies to a particular kind of photography (travel, portraits [outdoor and indoor], events) and lighting setup (one light with cable, pop-up flash, commander and remote, multiple remotes and more). However, while they are helpful they do suffer from a lack of space (each scenario has only a few paragraphs) and might not necessarily present that one scenario a reader really wants to figure out. For a real wealth of real-world experience, The Hot Shoe Diaries is a much better selection.

Take it for what it is

The Nikon Creative Lighting System may not devote enough space for using flashes in the field, but as a comprehensive overview of the Nikon Creative Lighting System it is well-done—clear, well-written and complete. Some readers may feel a glorified book of instructions is not what they need, and if that’s the case then steer clear of this one and use the instruction books that came with the products. But for that particular type of reader who uses several Nikon flash products and can use a book that covers it all, The Nikon Creative Lighting System is very well-done.

The Nikon Creative Lighting System
Mike Hagen
Nikonians Press/Rocky Nook
Rating: 9/10

BOOK REVIEW: Deke McClelland’s Photoshop CS4 and InDesign CS4 one-on-one Books



Deke McClelland is in my opinion one of the best instructors out there for Photoshop and other creative applications. He might also be the funniest (sorry, Scott Kelby). So I was glad to have the opportunity to read two recent books from his popular “one-on-one” series, Adobe InDesign CS4 one-on-one and Adobe Photoshop CS4 one-on-one. I think both of them are excellent resources for novice designers who are learning these two applications.

Both for beginners only

I think the very best books in the industry (or any books for that matter) are great because they are essential for beginners and experts alike. The one-on-one books don’t quite qualify in this regard, because they really are for beginners and novices. Expert users of InDesign and Photoshop don’t necessarily need these books unless they haven’t trained in a long while and feel they need to improve their basic and advanced skills.

As books for beginner and intermediate users, the one-on-one books are excellent. I had heard there were errors in these books but I didn’t find any myself. The layouts are well-done and Deke’s writing style is as loose and fun as ever without ruining the learning experience. The same goes for the videos included in the CD-ROM with each book: you don’t get the face time with Deke that you do in his more extensive videos with Lynda.com, but you get over four hours of tutorial footage with each book and it’s all narrated by Deke. These one-on-one books are a great value even at $50 each.

Whither CS4?

A major complaint I have with both these books is the lack of focus on features new to the CS4 versions of InDesign and Photoshop. Many of these features are certainly covered in the books but there is little indication to readers that they’re new to CS4. I wouldn’t expect the one-on-one books to talk all about new CS4 features (for that I recommend Ben Willmore’s Up to Speed series, one of my favorites) but there’s not even an icon to draw attention to CS4 features or a page at the beginning of the books to outline what’s new. I think flagging the CS4-specific information would have been a big help to all readers.

Not comprehensive but close

One more thing: both books do a great job providing all the essential information about InDesign and Photoshop but it’s not complete. In the Photoshop CS4 book, things such as HDR, Camera Raw, Photo Filter adjustment layers and the Lens Distortion filter among others were all missed or provided relatively little coverage. The InDesign CS4 book seemed better but some of the really advanced material such as GREP was not covered much. For beginners’ books such as these, I am not bothered that such advanced stuff was glossed over in favor of more essential features and techniques. But buyers should know that some topics, such as Camera Raw, are much better served by other books (for that topic I would recommend Real World Camera Raw with Adobe Photoshop CS3 by Jeff Schewe and the late Bruce Fraser).


Both Adobe Photoshop CS4 one-on-one and Adobe InDesign CS4 one-on-one are excellent books for beginners learning the trade: the quality of training in the pages and on the CD-ROM is very good. Those who are very familiar with Adobe InDesign CS3 one-on-one and Adobe Photoshop CS3 one-on-one may not need to purchase these as well—other than the CS4-related material, the books are probably very similar.

Adobe InDesign CS4 one-on-one
Rating: 9/10
Adobe Photoshop CS4 one-on-one
Rating: 8/10
Deke McClelland
Published by deke Press/O’Reilly

BOOK REVIEW: Universal Design for Web Applications


Wendy Chisholm is co-editor of the W3C’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0; Matt May is an accessibility engineer at Adobe and leader of the Web Standards Project Accessibility Task Force. With credentials like theirs, their book Universal Design for Web Applications has all the makings of an essential resource for web designers and developers who need their web applications to be accessible for everyone—and who doesn’t need their web applications to be accessible?

Lean but worth reading

This book is published by O’Reilly, and it seems to me that O’Reilly puts out books that are either (1) small and compact or (2) large and dense. Universal Design is one of the former, at less than 200 small pages. I actually prefer these to the larger tomes, and in this case it works great because the book is full of useful knowledge. The book’s title suggests it’s about web application design but most of it pertains to HTML/XHTML structure, forms and tables, scripts and some Ajax—all of which are just as pertinent for web designers if not more so. If you build websites for a living—but not necessarily web applications—then Universal Design is just as valuable a book for your bookshelf.

The information in this book is fairly comprehensive but not complete—the sections on structure and accessible code are fairly thorough but I wish there was more written about the process of creating such code, which is in the final chapter and only takes up a small portion of the book. It’s pretty good but experienced web designers who know next to nothing about universal design may need a little more help getting in the habit of building accessible web applications. But with the first couple chapters, which introduce and promote the concept of universal design, those in the field will have a pretty good idea of why it’s important and how to approach it on a basic level.

It’s ironic to me that web designers and developers are often manic about validation—they’ll proudly show their sites are XHTML-compliant and pooh-pooh those that aren’t—but sometimes don’t know much about all the factors involved in universal design, which is probably more important to their clientele. I would recommend any web designer or developer to pick up Universal Design for Web Applications, supplement it with online material from W3C and other accessibility resources, and change the way they construct their web products.

Universal Design for Web Applications
Wendy Chisholm and Matt May
Published by O’Reilly
Rating: 9/10

BOOK REVIEW: Neuro Web Design

Neuro Web Design cover
Neuro Web Design cover

Very few web design books I’ve seen explore the intersection of web design and psychology, which is why Neuro Web Design by Dr. Susan Weinschenk is such an interesting read. The book is not about usability or how people interact with websites; rather, it’s about why people interact with websites in terms of basic rational and emotional impulses. The book’s subtitle, “What makes them click?”, sums it up nicely.

Steeped in research

Neuro Web Design reads a lot like a textbook, citing various psychological studies that support a variety of observations such as:

  • Human beings’ need to reciprocate when they feel indebted,
  • Social validation as pressure to belong,
  • The self-centeredness of individuals,
  • If something seems unavailable, people want it even more,
  • Too many choices actually make things difficult for the chooser, and
  • The unconscious mind processes information as stories and pictures.

There are several more observations, but I won’t reveal all of this book’s insights. Each chapter focuses on one particular observation or rule, cites studies that illustrate how these rules operate in the real world, and then apply the rules to examples of websites. The idea is to control websites’ users’ behavior by taking advantage of the impulses we naturally share. It’s excellent material and I really got involved in reading this book, mostly because I’ve never read anything like it before. Usability books such as Steve Krug’s Don’t Make Me Think come close, but Neuro Web Design is more about natural impulses and less about usability.

Almost a book for website planners

My one criticism of Neuro Web Design is that there isn’t as much attention paid to web design as I would like. The majority of pages are devoted to the psychological material and in some chapters only a couple pages are used to apply the material to the field of web design.

Also, even though “web design” is discussed there is actually very little coverage of real design matters such as layout, color and typography. Neuro Web Design covers matters of web architecture, such as why it’s important to have product reviews (because people will want to do what others do) or try to sell fully loaded products first (because people fear losing anything). Such matters are on a different level of web design, and some web designers actually get little or no say at this stage of development—such things are sometimes decided upon by sales and marketing managers.


Neuro Web Design is an important book for any web designer’s bookshelf, and I think it applies to design in general as well. That’s partly because there is not a lot of web design-specific material in the book, which is a shame—this 150-page book could have really benefitted from 50 more pages about web design. If Dr.Weinschenk were to partner with a A-list web designer and produce a second edition of this book, I think it would be a classic.

Neuro Web Design
Dr. Susan Weinschenk
Published by New Riders
Rating: 9/10

BOOK REVIEW: A Project Guide to UX Design

UX Design Guide cover

A Project Guide to UX Design is a wonderful book about an aspect of web design that is both essential to success but a murky concept to grasp. I’m talking about “user experience design”, UX, which is the discipline of incorporating good usability in websites and web applications so site owners and users get good use out of the product. I was very excited to get my copy because CSS and Photoshop are both important things to know for the web but too many times a website just isn’t user-friendly, and it doesn’t matter how cool a website looks if it doesn’t serve its users.

Process, not design

I was somewhat disappointed by the book because “design” is in the title and I expected to learn some good usability principles, but most of this book covers elements of the web architecture process:

  • Working with clients to handle expectations, set up payment schedules, define development tasks and responsibilities and more
  • Analyzing the current web product and conducting user research and testing, including persona development
  • Web architecture, including site maps, task flows, wireframes and prototypes

I think user experience design should include user interface design, but in this book relatively little attention was given to details of user interface design. What is the best way to design a web form? Should images be used sparingly in this era of broadband? I wish this book spent more than a small fraction of its pages on such design questions, but I also think the book’s content is important material that belongs on a web designer’s bookshelf.

Hard answers for complex questions

Sometimes I was surprised by the strict advice given about topics that really have no right or wrong answers. This was particularly noticeable in Chapter 3, which covers proposals. I’m not sure such a topic belongs in a book about user experience design, but in any case proposals and business negotiations are usually malleable and influenced by the professional and the client. But co-author Russ Unger has firm views about the subject, such as the view that projects should never be paid 50% up front and 50% upon completion. I’ve actually used this arrangement for a variety of projects and it has worked well for my clients and myself. The book is not always unyielding in this way, and I’m glad it provides some quality methods for developing paperwork and proposals. However, some of these methods may be difficult for readers to change in their own situation—or they may not have the authority to change them at all.

A good book nonetheless

I regret that more of the book is not devoted to design, but it’s still a good read. Ironically, I’m particularly impressed by the book design, which is clean and clear. The sections on wireframing and prototyping excite me because they provide a comprehensive guide to building webpage structure on paper before a line of code is written. Again, different methods work for different people and the chapter on wireframing may seem overly complicated to some. I am also happy to see the authors bring in a variety of other people to comment, write sidebars or even entire chapters. The book is more diverse thanks to this variety of viewpoints, and other books I’ve reviewed recently have used a similar tactic.

A Project Guide to UX Design may be better titled A Project Guide to UX Architecture or something similar, because some web designers may be disappointed to learn this book is part freelance business guide, part web architecture best practices. It’s still a fine book that I would recommend for a web designer or developer who wants to improve their web architecture skills.

A Project Guide to UX Design
Russ Unger and Carolyn Chandler
Published by New Riders
Rating: 8/10