Tag Archives: HTML5

BOOK REVIEW: The Book of CSS3

Book of CSS3

HTML5 is probably the most desirable acronym to have in a web designer’s portfolio today, but I think the third iteration of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS3) has greater impact on a designer’s bottom line and clients’ satisfaction. This is because CSS3 can finally deliver the slick user interfaces that used to be only possible with Photoshop and a lot of hacking for Internet Explorer. Browsers are advanced enough today to apply CSS3 and make websites everywhere look extra sharp.

The Book of CSS3 by Peter Gasston covers the full gamut of CSS3 rules and features, and I think it’s a useful book for CSS coders of all skill levels. I use a lot of CSS3 to control backgrounds and box elements, but there are entire sections of the CSS3 spec that I never really appreciated until I read this book. Gradients, color, opacity, transitions and animations are all prime examples. Another is media queries, which Adobe has made easier to implement with recent versions of Dreamweaver.

The book is clear, well-written and documented with good examples. There are a good deal of images to illustrate CSS3 in action, but unfortunately the book is in black and white which sometimes makes the images less useful. A more useful part of the book is the browser chart at the end of each section and in Appendix A, detailing which browsers support the demonstrated CSS3 features. Unfortunately, Internet Explorer still lags behind other browsers and doesn’t support a lot of CSS3 features (though I think this will change with the next version of IE). There are a few CSS3 features that are so experimental that most if not all browsers fail to execute them, including flexible box and template layout structures.

CSS3 will most likely change in the near future. Technology is evolving at a more rapid pace; the Firefox browser, for example, will be updated on a faster schedule and we’ll see more versions (and more CSS3 support) quicker. But I think the basic capabilities of CSS3 are set and web designers need to look at CSS3 now if they want to be progressive and offer clients the best technology today. The Book of CSS3 is a good place to learn the full range of CSS3 features.

The Book of CSS3
Peter Gasston
Published by No Starch Press
US $34.95
Rating: 9/10

buy from amazon

Adobe MAX: Android, AIR, Edge, HTML5 and jQuery

Adobe MAX provided several news items and inspiring developments, but of course some of it is out in the wild now while others are only in the rough stages. Here are my impressions of several announcements made by Adobe at MAX.

Android and AIR

The strong penetration of the mobile marketplace by Android proves that Adobe was wise to develop for that operating system. Adobe announced AIR 2.5, which supports Android as well as Apple’s iOS and BlackBerry Tablet OS, and this really sets them apart as a platform-inclusive service provider. A more comprehensive news article on this can be found here.

AIR 2.5 is available today, as is the BlackBerry Tablet OS SDK. I can’t tell yet if AIR 2.5 will boast strong performance, but it’s important that it does. Since Apple banned Flash from iOS, some people have said online that Flash is a buggy and cumbersome technology that should be eliminated everywhere. I don’t see that myself, but if AIR 2.5 runs the same way then it will get the same criticisms.

The Edge prototype and HTML5

One of the most interesting early sneak peeks for me happened in the first keynote, when a prototype application codenamed “Edge” was demoed. Basically, Edge converts simple timeline-based animation to HTML5. A good demo can be found here on Adobe TV. Adobe also demoed a rough Flash-to-HTML5 export in its sneak peeks.

It’s important to notice Edge is not Flash: its focus on transitions and animation looks a lot like Flash Catalyst, which can produce Flash content but is not as robust as Flash Pro. My review of Flash Catalyst CS5 is here. I see Edge being rolled into Flash Catalyst at some point, perhaps as an HTML5 export feature in Flash Catalyst CS6. It performed well but, like Flash Catalyst, Edge only produces a subset of the what’s possible in Flash.

Again, Adobe is wise to push hard to get its content production tools on all platforms. Flash Player is still ubiquitous—CTO Kevin Lynch reported Flash Player 10.1 has the best market penetration ever seen with Flash Player—but the design community has its eyes on HTML5 as the next standard and device and software manufacturers need to follow their lead, whether or not it’s the best option for developers and consumers. I think it’s ironic some people criticize Adobe for sticking with the Flash Platform, while the things they demoed at MAX revolved around the adoption of HTML5 as an alternative.

jQuery

John Resig, the creator of the popular jQuery framework, sat in on one of the keynotes as Adobe touted some internal development happening with jQuery and jQuery Mobile, the latter of which is still in the alpha stages. There was some vague allusions to how Dreamweaver might integrate with jQuery in the future, and if that’s the case I would be curious how it combines with—or replaces—the Spry framework Dreamweaver already has. But details were scarce and there’s not a lot to report on this front.

Conclusion

I think that compared to last year’s MAX, this year touched on more platforms and runtimes. This is a response to the fragmentation of the developer marketplace due to HTML5 penetration and also the number of mobile operating systems coming out all at once.

This could be a great thing for future development but I personally worry that developing for iOS, Android, BlackBerry and HTML5—and possibly XHTML—will get us away from the standards-based mindset that has worked well in the web design community. The idea of “write once, publish everywhere” may still be possible, but it’s hard to see how it will work in practice.