Tag Archives: In Context

Adobe Web Apps, Part 1: InContext Editing

Adobe has become more and more aggressive in the field of web applications, producing various services like Photoshop Express and Acrobat.com to complement their shrink-wrapped software. According to Devin Fernandez, Senior Product Manager for Dreamweaver, the company’s “hosted services” strategy takes advantage of the convenience and quick development times inherent in online applications. Shorter production times means that these applications can be developed and improved faster and more often.

Betas for two new online applications were announced recently. One is BrowserLab, a service that allows website testing for multiple browsers. This practice is essential for any web designer and in the second part of this series I analyze and review BrowserLab. The other is InContext Editing, which I first saw last year at Adobe headquarters in San Jose and has since been upgraded to version 1.5 in late April.

InContext Editing

InContext Editing is a streamlined online content editing system deployable by Dreamweaver CS4 or the InContext Editing website, incontextediting.adobe.com. While many content management systems are proprietary and others like Drupal are open source and web-based, InContext Editing is a standalone web application so it doesn’t require extra code or installed software to work—all it requires is a modern browser. The user interface has the same gray design style found in BrowserLab and other Adobe web applications, and it looks good and works well.

Editing with InContext Editing is simple and effective.
Editing with InContext Editing is simple and effective.

InContext Editing has more functionality than BrowserLab but that also creates some weak user interface elements: for example, in order to reconfigure a website’s settings you have to click its Manage Users button, which then takes you a screen where the Configure Site button resides. It makes more sense to have both buttons available from the main window. Another example is the Remove Site button, which I had to use when one of my client’s websites launched and the testing site was no longer valid. It’s possible to remove a site from InContext Editing, but it’s not clear that all users must be deleted and all invitations rescinded before the Remove Site button reveals itself.

Managing users with InContext Editing is easy, but it can be hard sometimes to find what you need to administer users or site settings.
Managing users with InContext Editing is easy, but it can be hard sometimes to find what you need to administer users or site settings.

The other difficulty I had with InContext Editing is some difficulty handling content modified with JavaScript or Ajax. I learned this after using InContext Editing with a website modified with sIFR 3, which replaces text with Flash text so designers can use fonts beyond standard web fonts. InContext Editing was set up to edit a content block with only headings and paragraphs, but it said it could not function because prohibited tags were in the content block. I learned after some troubleshooting that sIFR, which was modifying the headings, caused the fatal error even though the HTML code was not modified. InContext Editing works well for simple webpages running standard HTML code, but scripts and dynamic content can make it incompatible. Adobe hopes to improve InContext Editing’s handling of these components in the future.

Despite these usability issues, and what seems to be a lot of time loading pages and building editing screens, InContext Editing is a handy tool for web designers whose clients have small pages and want to revise some content. I like that it’s simple, quick, and doesn’t require any software installation. It’s supposed to be so easy that anyone can use it, but there’s a learning curve and I had to consult with the help files a few times.

InContext Editing + Contribute?

One thing that excited me about InContext Editing was the possibility of using it in tandem with Contribute. One of my clients in particular already uses Contribute in-house for content management and the combination of Contribute and InContext Editing would have allowed them to edit content inside and outside the office. However, it seems that Contribute CS4 will not allow editing if InContext Editing code is detected on a page. Adobe’s position is that InContext Editing is designed to make simple updates to basic webpages, while Contribute is designed for more sophisticated webpages and workgroups.

Two benefits for Dreamweaver users

Adobe has made both BrowserLab and InContext Editing especially tempting for Dreamweaver CS4 users. InContext Editing is easily deployed by Dreamweaver CS4, with editable and repeating regions available with a click in the InContext Editing panel. You can also manage the CSS classes available to clients with this panel. The code for InContext Editing regions is quite clean, with a single div tag around the editable content:

< div ice:editable="*" > Content here < /div > (spaces added for clarity)

Editable regions can be inserted with Dreamweaver CS4, very much like template editable regions.
Editable regions can be inserted with Dreamweaver CS4, very much like template editable regions.

The asterisk property for the “editable” attribute allows all available HTML formatting in InContext Editing, including strong/em, indenting, creating lists, inserting images and more. The web designer, working with Dreamweaver CS4, can restrict these however he or she chooses. Regions can also be created directly with InContext Editing from the web browser. The other treat for Dreamweaver CS4 users is the ability to set up a keyboard shortcut for invoking InContext Editing within a web browser—however, it involves editing a JavaScript file and looks like anyone with an HTML editor (or a text editor) can hack it. Here’s how it’s done:

  1. Open the ice.conf.js file. If you use Dreamweaver to set up a website for InContext Editing, this will be found in includes/ice/ by default.
  2. Rewrite the PC keyboard shortcut (found in line 43) and the Mac keyboard shortcut (found in line 60).

The future of InContext Editing

I’m curious to see how InContext Editing fares in the future, given the many choices available to web designers for editing and managing content. Adobe is currently meeting with InContext Editing customers for feedback for a version 2 to be released in the future, but we’ll see how that turns out. It’s hard to say how much InContext Editing will change from version 1 to version 2, but I think InContext Editing’s simplicity and its browser-based ease of use gives it a lot of potential. More robust editing and management tools will help InContext Editing secure a place in the web designer’s toolkit.

Adobe Releases InContext Editing 1.5

Adobe recently released Adobe InContext Editing 1.5, a new content management tool that allows clients and other users to edit website content in a browser and without coding skills. Contribute has traditionally been Adobe’s only product to allow this kind of editing capabilities, but Dreamweaver CS4 introduced InContext Editing last year and Adobe is developing it further.

From the press release:

“Adobe InContext Editing 1.5 is a fully hosted online service that extends the productivity and profitability potential of Adobe Creative Suite 4. InContext Editing enables the less technical client to easily update their Web site content from any browser without installing any additional software. In addition, this new hosted service gives professional Web designers the ability to enhance their business with long-term cost effective maintenance programs they can offer their clients, while enabling them to also have more time to spend on what they do best – design work.”

Editable regions are created in Dreamweaver with the same process used to create editable regions for Contribute, so InContext Editing can actually serve as an online substitute for Contribute (though Contribute has more capabilities). InContext Editing is available through a web application similar to what’s found at Acrobat.com, and web designers can set up websites at the InContext Editing Administration Panel found at http://incontextediting.adobe.com/.

Key benefits from the new InContext Editing 1.5 release include:

  • Ability for professional Web designers to assign editable regions to a Web site from directly within a browser;
  • Simplified administration controls for Web designers to easily safeguard design integrity;
  • Web-based editing capabilities for Web designers’ clients to make updates from virtually anywhere.

A free preview of InContext Editing 1.5 is available now at http://incontextediting.adobe.com/. More information about this hosted service can be found at http://www.adobe.com/products/incontextediting/. I’ve requested some extra materials from Adobe and I hope to speak with someone on the development team, so stay tuned for more information.