Tag Archives: management

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Released From Public Beta, Now $149

After a relatively short beta period, Adobe has released version 4 of Photoshop Lightroom, its photography application for management, development and production of digital photography.

A larger review will be forthcoming, but here are some of the major new features in Lightroom 4:

  • A Map Module that includes location tagging controls and a standard map that places photos in the locations they were shot
  • Video format support for trimming and extracting frames from video clips, applying adjustments to clips and sharing video to Facebook and Flickr
  • Simplified basic adjustment controls
  • Soft proofing features in the Develop module
  • More local adjustment controls such as Noise Reduction and Moiré
  • Templates and tools for creating photo books in the new Book module
  • An email engine within Lightroom for sending mail directly from the application

Adobe has also added some aggressive pricing to Lightroom 4, making it just $149 for the full version and $79 for the upgrade. Lightroom has typically cost $299 for the full version. Tom Hogarty, Lightroom’s main product manager, said, “Lowering the price makes Lightroom more accessible to a broader range of photographers—from pros to amateurs.” This makes sense to me—more and more amateur photographers want to work with professional tools and take their work to the next level—but I also think Adobe wants to compete aggressively with free and cheap photography products on the shelves and online.

Press Release

Innovative Shadow and Highlight Recovery and Enhanced Digital Photography Workflows Mark A Milestone Release

SAN JOSE, Calif. — March 6, 2012 — Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced the availability of Adobe® Photoshop® Lightroom® 4 software for Mac OS and Windows. Lightroom is the essential digital photography workflow solution helping amateur and professional photographers quickly import, manage, enhance and showcase their images. First released as a public beta in January 2012, the final version of Lightroom 4 is now available for US$149 for the full version and US$79 for the upgrade, providing an incredible value for photographers. Lightroom 4 introduces refined technology for superior shadow and highlight processing, ability to create photo books, additional local adjustment controls, and enhanced video support.

“Feedback from our customers is invaluable in developing Lightroom and the real trick to a great release is to combine these insights with Adobe’s unrivalled image processing innovation,” said Winston Hendrickson, vice president products, Creative Media Solutions, Adobe. “Lightroom 4 is a stunning new release that will enhance photography workflows and help photographs stand out from the crowd.”

New Features in Lightroom 4

Lightroom 4 is a major release, adding significant new capabilities and innovations. New adjustment controls maximize dynamic range from cameras, recovering exceptional shadow details and highlights. The software features new and improved auto adjustments to dynamically set values for exposure and contrast, and additional local adjustment controls including Noise Reduction, Moire and White Balance.

Lightroom 4 provides photographers the tools to create beautiful photo books with text controls and a variety of easy-to-use templates, as well as a direct link for photo book creation from within the new Book module. A new intuitive Map module displays images already assigned a location, provides location tagging and reverse geo-tagging controls and saved locations for easy assignment of a photographer’s common locations.

Now, native video support gives photographers the capability to play, trim and extract frames from video clips shot on DSLRs, point-and-shoot cameras and smartphones. Video-specific presets and many standard Lightroom image adjustment controls can be applied to video clips, and adjusted videos can be exported as a H.264 file or published directly to Facebook or Flickr*.

In the Develop module, presets fully utilize new processing technology and the addition of soft proofing helps photographers tune images in a destination color space to ensure content looks its best. In addition, customers can now email images directly from Lightroom using an email account of their choice.

Pricing and Availability

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 is now available for Mac and Windows at www.adobe.com/store. The estimated street price is US$149 for new users or US$79 for upgrades. For more detailed information about product features, upgrade policies, pricing and language versions, please visit www.adobe.com/go/lightroom.

Users can also connect with the Lightroom team directly on Facebook (www.facebook.com/lightroom), via Twitter (www.twitter.com/lightroom) or on the Adobe Lightroom blog (http://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjournal). For Lightroom how-to videos, visit http://www.youtube.com/lightroom.

Adobe Photoshop Family

Adobe Photoshop and Photoshop Extended are at the heart of the Photoshop family, joined by solutions for users at every level who want to bring out the best in their digital images either at home, in the office or on the go. Photoshop Lightroom addresses the workflow needs of amateur and professional photographers, helping them create, manage and showcase images in impactful ways. Photoshop Elements provides consumers with powerful yet easy-to-use tools that organize, edit, create and share photo memories. For mobile devices, the Adobe Photoshop Touch app helps users transform images with core Photoshop features custom-built for tablets; and Adobe Photoshop Express is a free app for simple photo fixes and enhancements, and sharing to social networks*.

About Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe is changing the world through digital experiences. For more information, visit www.adobe.com.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Enters Public Beta


The alternate splash screen for Lightroom 4 with its “Sprocket” codename.

Last week, Adobe announced Photoshop Lightroom 4 and released the photo management software as a public beta available on Adobe Labs. Lightroom has enjoyed a public beta for each of its four iterations and it’s one reason the product has been popular among photographers. “Giving early customer access to new versions of Lightroom has helped our team deliver an outstanding battle-tested product that really stands up to the demands of photographers worldwide,” said Winston Hendrickson, vice president of Digital Imaging Products for Adobe.

The new features in Lightroom 4 are ready to be tried and tested, including:

  • A Map Module that includes location tagging controls and a standard map that places photos in the locations they were shot
  • Video format support for trimming and extracting frames from video clips, applying adjustments to clips and sharing video to Facebook and Flickr
  • Simplified basic adjustment controls
  • Soft proofing features in the Develop module
  • More local adjustment controls such as Noise Reduction and Moiré
  • Templates and tools for creating photo books in the new Book module
  • An email engine within Lightroom for sending mail directly from the application

I saw a quick demo and what I found most interesting were the new Map and Book modules. The Map module provides a really striking visual representation of the photographer’s journey around the world, though it’s probably a bit depressing for the user who doesn’t jet around the world very often. The bookmaking features are intriguing to me, and the Book module exports to PDF or publication at Blurb.com, an online publisher.

There are also many smaller features, including “fast load data” in DNG files for faster load times in Lightroom 4. You can also have a lossy (less than top quality) comp for fast loading. Another nice addition is soft proofing and gamut warnings for screen and print profiles. I’ll be curious to try these but I know it’s traditionally hard to get precise color management exactly right. One more note for holdouts on Windows XP: Lightroom will require Windows Vista and newer with version 4.

Adobe’s press release on the Lightroom 4 announcement is here.

Pantone Releases CAPSURE Color Measurement Device

capsure_box

Yesterday Pantone announced the immediate availability of CAPSURE, a handheld device that lets designers and creative professionals measure and match color on almost any material. A similar product has been available in Europe since spring 2010, released by X-Rite for the commercial paint market, but this is the first time it has been marketed to the United States–with PANTONE Color Libraries included–and to the creative market in general.

“CAPSURE’s advanced image capture technology sets a new standard for accuracy and versatility in a portable device,” said Giovanni Marra, director of corporate marketing at Pantone. “The real power of CAPSURE is its ability to measure the color of any surface, including small, patterned and multi-colored textures and textiles, which can confound other instruments because of their textural complexity, and quickly match them to more than 8,000 PANTONE Colors.”

CAPSURE ships with the most important PANTONE Color libraries pre-loaded. Fashion designers and home decorators will appreciate the FASHION + HOME and PAINT + INTERIORS Library, but graphic designers will be most familiar with the PLUS SERIES, which is the next generation of the PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM, and the PANTONE Goe library. These constitute almost all important colors for reproduction on paper or on screen, and more can be added through the included CAPSURE Sync software.

The device

I’ve been testing the CAPSURE for a couple weeks now and have been paying close attention to the design of the device itself. It ships with a wrist cord and a carrying case that makes it easy to handle and it sports a nice design with a built-in calibration swatch that can be slid away from the sensor when in use and back to cover it when in storage.

One minor complaint is it seems I have to press and hold the power button when turning it on—a regular button press is not registered. I also think the CAPSURE is too large and bulky, which might concern designers who want the slimmest and most stylish devices in their pockets and bags. The device’s size is comparable to an old cell phone from the early 2000s. It’s perfectly at home on a paint salesman’s or press operator’s belt but it can look clunky next to an iPhone.

Using CAPSURE

The device is easy to use. The sensor captures 27 images in under two seconds and triangulates the best color match it can. Note that the camera doesn’t work with light-creating samples such as those on monitors. CAPSURE can store up to 100 colors and it will also show multiple colors in a multi-color sample. It can also build color schemes or select related colors to help you create a larger palette. The screen is a bit small but the user interface works really well and everything is readable and navigable on screen.

capsure_screen

You can also record text or voice tags with your color samples, which is really helpful if you’re using CAPSURE to catalog inspiring colors in the field. These tags can be retrieved with the CAPSURE Palette Application software, which also will bring color palettes into Adobe Creative Suite and QuarkXPress. Note that the Palette Application software is available only as a download after completing the product registration; CAPSURE Sync only updates the device’s color libraries.

Will it match?

I tested CAPSURE by scanning known and unknown color samples in a variety of materials including wallpaper, fabric, color laser printing and offset lithography. One set of samples came from a new Pantone swatchbook I unwrapped specifically to test this device. I didn’t know what to expect but I know how hard it is to exactly reproduce color, so I thought CAPSURE might come close to matching colors. I ended up being right.

The device measured a known sample of PAN 287 (blue) printed with a color laser printer and judged it to be PAN 7686. It also measured PAN 143 (yellow) as PAN 142 and PAN 179 (red) as PLUS 58-8. These are all close measurements and I was impressed the yellow measurement was one digit off. These results were duplicated by my scanning of a PANTONE Fashion Color Report produced earlier this year. CAPSURE matched one color exactly and on most of the rest it was only a digit or two off.

The most matches came from the Pantone swatchbook. CAPSURE did particularly well matching magentas, greens and blues exactly but had few exact matches with yellows, oranges, grays and browns. Even when the device could not match the color exactly it was usually only one number away. This might not be good enough when testing a print run for a difficult client who demands their logo reproduce exactly, but it will be satisfactory for all other situations.

capsure_use

CAPSURE effectively scanned odd materials and returned good matches of the colors. I recommend holding the capture button halfway when working with textures: the display will show a magnified view of the sample and you can move the device to capture the best section. One thing I noticed is the display shifts color depending on the angle you view it. Be sure to use the display only as a guide and use swatchbooks for confirmation.

Pricing and availability

CAPSURE ships now and the price is US$649. The device and software are compatible for both Mac and PC. (The Palette Application Software will be Mac-compatible in January 2011.) I don’t think I will keep the device in my bag of books and digital devices but it will stay on my desk and I think I could make it a regular part of my camera bag to capture color as well as photography when I’m traveling.

CAPSURE
Pantone
US$649
Rating: 8/10

BOOK REVIEW: The DAM Book, Second Edition

dambook

Peter Krogh‘s The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers, Second Edition is a fabulous resource: 500 pages encompassing all aspects of digital asset management (DAM) for photographers. Software products like Lightroom serve to control most aspects of DAM (and, in Lightroom’s case, publish digital photos as well) and many Lightroom books I’ve reviewed are surveys of digital asset management options. However, The DAM Book stands out because of its depth, knowledgeable author and full coverage.

Sorely needed and still relevant

Digital photography has changed radically in the last five years and a book like The DAM Book needs a new edition now and then to stay relevant. The second edition has several important changes in its content and Peter does a good job of drawing attention to revised recommendations and techniques. Digital photography has changed enough in the last few years that I would recommend buying The DAM Book even if you already own a copy of the first edition.

It’s also refreshing to note that The DAM Book has several chapters that remain timeless and rooted in the fundamentals of digital asset management. Topics like image storage, backup and validation, cataloging and data migration change very little no matter what hot gear is in the latest issue of your photo store catalog. I’m a reviewer who has a lot of stale and outdated books on his shelf, everything from two-year-old Lightroom books to Photoshop 7 Down & Dirty Tricks, and I appreciate the books that earn a place of the shelf every year.

Good visuals and writing

The DAM Book nails the three crucial elements of photography book design: good writing, good photography and good graphic design. I was pleasantly surprised that there are many diagrams in The DAM Book: file organization, photo workflows, archive systems, RAID, hard drive backup systems and more are all charted clearly and supported by Peter’s clear writing style. I referred to these diagrams often when I was developing my own backup strategy and system.

The DAM Book is a little out of the ordinary in that Peter’s photography is not emphasized in favor of prolific text and charts. This goes against the usual strategy of publishing large photos in photography books—Scott Kelby’s books often cover the majority of its pages with photos and screenshots. But I’m very happy that Peter made the writing the primary content: his photos are beautiful and he lists the keywords catalogued with each photo, but the written content is properly emphasized. And while not everyone will find his recommendations to their liking, Peter makes sure to list as many options as possible and explain the pros and cons of each one.

Conclusion

The DAM Book is a timeless resource—I’d put it on par with Dan Margulis’ Professional Photoshop for its depth, its breadth (almost 500 pages long) and thorough assessment of digital asset management techniques. This is the book I’ve used to help catalog my own digital photos, and I will be going through the book again to refine my system. It’s an excellent buy for any professional digital photographer.

The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers, Second Edition
Peter Krogh
Published by O’Reilly
US$49.99
Rating: 10/10

Adobe Releases InContext Editing 1.5

Adobe recently released Adobe InContext Editing 1.5, a new content management tool that allows clients and other users to edit website content in a browser and without coding skills. Contribute has traditionally been Adobe’s only product to allow this kind of editing capabilities, but Dreamweaver CS4 introduced InContext Editing last year and Adobe is developing it further.

From the press release:

“Adobe InContext Editing 1.5 is a fully hosted online service that extends the productivity and profitability potential of Adobe Creative Suite 4. InContext Editing enables the less technical client to easily update their Web site content from any browser without installing any additional software. In addition, this new hosted service gives professional Web designers the ability to enhance their business with long-term cost effective maintenance programs they can offer their clients, while enabling them to also have more time to spend on what they do best – design work.”

Editable regions are created in Dreamweaver with the same process used to create editable regions for Contribute, so InContext Editing can actually serve as an online substitute for Contribute (though Contribute has more capabilities). InContext Editing is available through a web application similar to what’s found at Acrobat.com, and web designers can set up websites at the InContext Editing Administration Panel found at http://incontextediting.adobe.com/.

Key benefits from the new InContext Editing 1.5 release include:

  • Ability for professional Web designers to assign editable regions to a Web site from directly within a browser;
  • Simplified administration controls for Web designers to easily safeguard design integrity;
  • Web-based editing capabilities for Web designers’ clients to make updates from virtually anywhere.

A free preview of InContext Editing 1.5 is available now at http://incontextediting.adobe.com/. More information about this hosted service can be found at http://www.adobe.com/products/incontextediting/. I’ve requested some extra materials from Adobe and I hope to speak with someone on the development team, so stay tuned for more information.